Call us now ! Send us an email http://maps.google.com/maps?q=6828 Springfield Ave Suite 1 Laredo United States

Back to Top

By Appointment Only

Contact Us Today 

(956) 726-4060

By Appointment Only

Contact Us Today 

(956) 726-4060

Health & Wellness

Dr. Hector Cantu is here to support you and your family in the years to come. In this section, he has provided
some important information and resource links that might be beneficial. Use the links to navigate to a subject
that best meets your need. If you have questions that can not be answered on our website, please call our office
and we will be happy to assist you. 


newborn

Welcome, baby!
 FIRST THINGS TO DO 
 First, relax and enjoy your baby.
 Second, call and set up your baby’s first appointment. We want to see your baby within two days of going home from the hospital. This visit entails a physical examination where we also check baby’s weight and signs of increased jaundice. The visit helps parents ask questions about their child. The next routine check-up would be at two weeks of age.
 Third, call your insurance company to make sure your baby is added to your insurance as soon as possible.  Generally, the baby will be covered for the first 30 days by the same policy that covers the mother.
 Fourth, consult our website for additional information.

JAUNDICE
Half of infants become jaundiced (yellow colored) within the first few days of life. Dr. Cantu will be monitoring your infant for any signs of jaundice. Jaundice typically begins on the face and upper trunk and then as levels increase, the eyes, arms and legs of an infant can appear yellow.  
Please call our office to make arrangements for us to check your baby if the whites of the baby’s eyes or the arms or legs are becoming yellow. Most infants who become jaundiced do not require any treatment for it, but need to be evaluated by the doctor.
You can prevent significant jaundice by feeding your baby frequently (every 2-3 hours) for the first week of life and keeping baby next to a sunny window.  

FEEDING

In general, newborns should be fed on a modified demand schedule. This means that the baby should be allowed to feed every 2-3 hours, but should be awakened if he sleeps beyond four hours. After the baby has had a 2week visit, you will no longer have to awaken at night to feed. But most babies do continue their night feeds at least through the first month of life. Expect your baby to feed 8 to 10 times a day in the first few weeks of life.
To awaken a sleepy baby to feed him, undress him, rub his hands and feet. You may need to do this several times during a feeding. Signs that your baby is hungry are rooting, sucking on its hand or crying.

Signs that your baby is feeding well include:
 >at least 4 wet diapers by 3 days of age
 >6 or more wet diapers by 5 days of age
 >3 or more bowel movements a day
 >hearing the baby swallow
 >seeing milk on the baby’s lips
 >baby being content after feeding


CIRCUMCISION CARE
Vaseline and gauze should be applied to the circumcised penisfor one week. If a Plastibell was applied, no care is needed;just wait for the plastic ring to fall off on its own. Your sonwill need to be seen by the doctor if the penis becomes red,swollen or is bleeding or if there is redness to the penile shaft or adjacent abdominal wall.

TEMPERATURE, FEVER, SIGNS OF ILLNESS

A fever in an infant (age 0-3 months) is defined as a rectal temperature of 100.4° F or above. If your newborn has a fever, call our office immediately.
The most accurate way to take a temperature is with a rectal thermometer. We recommend you purchase a digital thermometer and become accustomed to taking rectal temperatures. Take your baby’s temperature if he/she feels warm, is fussy or unusually sleepy and is not eating well.
In addition to fevers, there are other signs of possible illness that will require your infant to be seen by the doctor. If your infant becomes lethargic, refuses to feed, has inconsolable crying, or has repeated projectile (forceful) vomiting, then baby should be seen by the doctor or call the answering service if after office hours.
                    

preventing & treating ear infections

image-1486713-Ear-Infections-Antibiotics_Page_1.w640.png
image-1486714-Ear-Infections-Antibiotics_Page_2.png

Runny nose from a cold: does your child need antibiotics?

image-1486715-runny-nose-bw-faqs.w640.png

Immunization Schedule

image-1261922-Inmunizations.w640.jpg